TN NEWS

Rebuilding History: How Engineers Modernized The L.A. Memorial Coliseum

The Italian travertine that gave the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum’s peristyle its historic look since opening in 1923 had lost a bit of its shine. But giving the 96-year-old building a modern twist necessitated much more than a quick polish. The $315 million renovation required architects, building engineers, and sound engineers to revamp the modernity of the stadium while creating a brand-new, seven-story premium tower without losing a single piece of the venue’s historic stone façade. It wasn’t an easy task.The Coliseum—next door to the campus of the University of Southern California and home to USC football, temporary home to the NFL’s L.A. Rams, and past host of two Olympics, the World Series, Super Bowls, and the Pope— oozes history. (The venue will also hold its third Olympics in 2028.) So to allow one of the nation’s most decorated stadiums to continue its traditions, USC officials knew that not only did the venue need a refurbishment, but it also demanded a complete rethinking of premium space, as a 3,000-capacity Scholarship Tower had to open in time for football this fall.History, though, couldn’t be ignored. Using the template of the existing two-story press box, DLR Group designed a way to carve the new 235,000 square feet of space into the existing bowl, touching the existing press box but not eliminating the historic feel of a bowl originally built in a park, and certainly not altering the building’s famed façade.“What makes it a National Historic Landmark,” says Don Barnum, DLR Group principal and lead of the firm’s Sports Studio, “is not just bricks and mortar, but all the things that have happened in the building.”The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, built in 1923, has hosted two Olympics, the World Series, Super Bowls, and the Pope.University of Southern CaliforniaGetty ImagesBuilding the TowerThe new Scholarship Tower includes two levels of Founders Suites; dining services; a club lounge expected to host events all year; a level of suites that celebrities like Will Ferrell have already signed on for; and a rooftop deck akin to a downtown LA hotel’s rooftop, with 360-degree views and hopes for activities throughout the year.That historic designation, though, did place limitations on the design, requiring the existing façade to remain and capping the height of any additions to no taller than the 101 feet the press box stood above the street. “On a historic preservation,” Barnum says, “a lot of things come into what makes it a historic landmark and it is not just a view. We have to maintain that integrity.”To make it happen, DLR Group brought in Nabih Youseff Associates Structural Engineers (NYA) of Los Angeles to devise a solution for the Scholarship Tower that could create a modern premium experience while retaining the historic nature of the building, including portions of the press box.Ryan Wilkerson, principal with NYA, says it was a matter of taking a building designed in the 1920s for the singular focus of giving a fan a seat in a bowl and rethinking how a modern, seven-story building with updated codes and uses could fit. “How you do that was our big challenge,” Wilkerson says. “Layer on top of that, while a big project, there is not a ton of square footage. Floor to floor, each use has a different response the building has to provide, how we get people in and out. The structure couldn’t be continuous.”Engineers approached the Scholarship Tower and each floor’s unique design by using a buckling restrained brace system, meant to provide the strength of a brace but with the flexibility that buckling brings, able to work both for the new tower and the historic stadium’s upper reaches of cast-in-place concrete.Nabih Youssef Associates Structural EngineersWhenever the old and new buildings did meet, using computer modeling, structural engineers were able to study the interfaces to see how to handle the challenge of blending the two.Nabih Youssef Associates Structural EngineersHow Wilkerson approached the Scholarship Tower and each floor’s unique design led to using a buckling restrained brace system, meant to provide the strength of a brace but with the flexibility that buckling brings, able to work both for the new tower and the historic stadium’s upper reaches of cast-in-place concrete.“It is not about strength,” Wilkerson says about the philosophy. “When [the Coliseum] was designed, it was about how much strength you need to keep it from falling apart. Now it’s more like a car with a crumple zone, more about flexibility and movement.”The buckling restrained brace bridges the historic with the modern by creating a brace with its inherent stiffness, but also serving as a mechanism that makes the brace elongate and stretch like a rubber band, allowing the motion of the building to concentrate all energy in one small steel plate inside the larger tubed brace system. The brace, then, provides both strength and a crumple zone, of sorts, for the new structure.And it allows for flexibility.By engineering braces specific for each level, Wilkerson was able to move braces to different parts of the building, depending on usage needs. “It is a tightly controlled capacity and that allows us to design it into where we want this ductility to occur,” he says.But Wilkerson still needed to deal with the historic building—something he couldn’t strengthen or weaken because of the façade. So the design built the Scholarship Tower around the old concrete and isolated the tower from it, not needing the old structure to resist the new structure, but using the new one to offload the old one so it wouldn’t have to work as hard.The old tower, then, acts as an island in the middle of the bigger tower. Everywhere around it, slide-bearing connection joints maintain up to 9 inches of space, allowing the old and new towers to move independently from each other. This also allowed engineers to design the new portion to requirements of modern code without imposing that code on the historic portion.“The existing structure of the stadium is maintained in place, expressing it in the club lounge,” Barnum says. “People should recognize it as the stadium structure.”“The existing structure of the stadium is maintained in place, expressing it in the club lounge,” says Don Barnum, DLR Group principal and lead of the firm’s Sports Studio. “People should recognize it as the stadium structure.”Nabih Youssef Associates Structural EngineersEngineers reduced the dead weight of the pre ...Read more

Sports Couverture Chute Avant Ancien Million Université Remplacement Voyage Chaîne de télévision Football Emploi Projet Voiture Connection Italie été Energie Design Technologie Equipement Peuple Bâtiment Maison Hôtel Force Information Pouvoir far Ouverture Offre Mobile Ooredoo Nation fraiche Milieu Ingénierie Feuilletons et Séries WIFI Aménagement Solution Endroit Marque Intégration Devise Réseau Valeur koora jaime Zone Ordinateur Droit Compte Diode électroluminescente Experience Code Rue Année Line Stade Seat Analytique Ferme Exact Prochaine Étape Le meilleur Courtoisie Super Succès Limité Office National de l'éléctricité et de l'eau potable Debout la République New York Los Angeles Centre Ville

Articles similaires