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'It's sentimental': Titanic slowly disintegrates into ocean floor

A retired Dalhousie University civil engineering professor predicts the RMS Titanic will only be around for another 25 years before it disintegrates into the ocean floor.Henrietta Mann made the comment after seeing some of the first-ever 4K images of the ill-fated liner that were released this week.The images were taken from a video by Atlantic Productions and show how much the ship has deteriorated in 14 years."It's sentimental," Mann said. "You know, we learn so much. So many lives had been lost. It's like a historic icon and I feel a little bit sorry for the next generation. They will have only footage. There won't be actually the wreck any longer."More than 1,500 people diedThe Titanic struck an iceberg the night of April 14, 1912, and sank nearly 600 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland. It sits 3,810 metres below the North Atlantic surface.More than 1,500 people died. Some of them are buried in Halifax.The exact location of the wreckage was discovered by French and U.S. explorers in 1985.An archival image of the British liner Titanic as it sailed out of Southampton, England, at the start of its doomed voyage on April 10, 1912. (Canadian Press/AP)One thing that stood out to Mann after looking at the new Titanic images was that the rusticles — the icicle-like formations that were once a bright reddish colour — have turned to grey.Mann theorizes this is because they're covered with marine snow. Those are small particles of organic matter from the top of the ocean that have settled at the bottom."Which tells you that [rusticles] are not growing as fast as before if snow can accumulate in such large quantities. When I say quantities, we are talking about just ...Read more

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